Critical Thinking Checklist

Critical Thinking Checklist-55
Some dental educators ask, "What does critical thinking look like in the clinic? How do I successfully teach students to use critical thinking skills when they don't read before class or attend class regularly" This toolkit is designed to begin answering those questions.The Critical Thinking Skills Toolbox was developed and written by Linda S. D., Distinguished Teaching Scholar and Professor at the University of Florida. A drawback to using holistic rating scales is that they do not provide specific areas of strengths and weaknesses and therefore are less useful to help you focus your improvement efforts.

Some dental educators ask, "What does critical thinking look like in the clinic? How do I successfully teach students to use critical thinking skills when they don't read before class or attend class regularly" This toolkit is designed to begin answering those questions.

If so, the following information/links will help you to understand how to approach this: in order to write more critically you need to develop your critical thinking skills and then apply these to your writing...

Further resources: Contact the University writer in residence for a 1-2-1 appointment to help to develop your critical writing skills, email for an appointment at: [email protected] Cottrell, Stella.

Evaluate carefully whether this the most appropriate tool for your assessment needs.

They can provide more detailed feedback on student performance; more consistent scoring among raters but the disadvantage is that they can be time-consuming to develop and apply.

We often make the mistake of confusing being critical with being negative or "nit-picking" and this is unfortunate.

Anybody can adopt a negative position to any point of view simply by saying "no" but this is not being critical, more often than not this is simply being awkward.

Results can be aggregated to provide detailed information on strengths and weaknesses of a program. Includes analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and/or other critical manipulation of ideas, throughout— leading to an overall sense that the piece could withstand critical analysis by experts in the discipline.

Tip: Adding numbers to the ratings can make scoring easier.

However, if you plan to also use the rating scale for course-level assessment grading as well, a meaning must be attached to that score.

For example, what is the minimum score that would be considered acceptable for a “C.” Tips: Keep list of characteristics manageable by only including critical evaluative components. Retrieved April 12, 2010 from Tierney, Robin & Marielle Simon.

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