Essay Realism Literature

Essay Realism Literature-67
Additionally, this literary realist era can be seen as the natural development of an age forced to acknowledge a number of new ‘realities’.The industrial revolution of the late 18th century and thereafter had wrought swift and far-reaching changes on society.If realism is viewed as any narrative claiming to reflect the ‘real’ world, then most mainstream fiction and cinema today can be described as realist texts.

Additionally, this literary realist era can be seen as the natural development of an age forced to acknowledge a number of new ‘realities’.The industrial revolution of the late 18th century and thereafter had wrought swift and far-reaching changes on society.If realism is viewed as any narrative claiming to reflect the ‘real’ world, then most mainstream fiction and cinema today can be described as realist texts.

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Auerbach’s unique and scholarly approach in his magnum opus, Mimesis (written over three years at the height of World War II in Istanbul after fleeing Nazi Germany), was to forensically examine excerpts from longer texts to a close reading of their stylistic features (grammar, syntax, and diction) in an attempt to ascertain the broader questions of culture and society and ‘reality’ in their historical context. Auerbach committed himself totally to historical perspectivism, which “holds that each epoch and civilization [sic] has its own possibilities of aesthetic perfection.

The universally human [or ‘real’] is to be perceived in the finest works of each epoch, manifest in a form or style unique to it” (Calin, 1999).

His realism focuses not on questions of form or content, but on social function” (Goring, 2001).

Does that mean we should not be bound by what the author said, or thought he was saying, but cede authority to the reader? For Hungarian philosopher and theorist, Georg Lukacs, realism placed a high premium on two things: Firstly, “portraying the totality of reality in some form or other and secondly, penetrating beneath the surface appearance of reality so as to be able to grasp the underlying laws of historical change” (Goring, 2001).

For over forty-five years, American Literary Realism has brought readers critical essays on American literature from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. locations, $25.00 *Online access is provided via the JSTOR Current Scholarship Program.

The whole panorama of great authors from this key transition period in American literary history, including Henry James, Edith Wharton, Mark Twain, and many others, is discussed in articles, book reviews, critical essays, bibliographies, documents, and notes on all related topics. The pastoral, ‘cottage’ realm made way for the first wave of human urbanisation and worker alienation.With its factory system, the growth of cities, quick wealth to be had, keen competition, increased migration, and shifting of social classes, the industrial revolution and its aftermath gave a whole new body of material for writers to report and interpret.According to this theory, suggests Eagleton (2003), realism is a relationship between the artwork and its audience, “in which case your play can be realistic on Monday but not on Thursday.One person’s realism is another’s fantasy.” Realism, in this context, is a matter of what the audience or readers ‘get out of the thing’, not what an author might put into it.In this sense, a work in the ‘Brechtian’ tradition is realistic not once and for all, but by reference to its ability at a particular time and place to allow individuals to understand and to change the conditions of their existence.For Brecht, “reality changes and in order to represent reality, modes of representation must also change.According to literary critic James Wood (2000), because reality exists so fiercely in and for his [Gogol’s] characters, “they in turn exist fiercely for us”.Though Gogol’s characters are fantasists and their inner lives often entirely fictional, their world is thoroughly real to a reader because the author presents a world-view that corresponds to their [the readers’] own subject position, perpetuating, rather than simply reflecting, cultural meanings and norms (UTS, 2008).Each issue is also a valuable bibliographic resource. Recent issues have included essays on Jack London and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.

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