Music Nowadays Essay

Music Nowadays Essay-29
In the late-80s, the top ten producers were credited with half as many hits, about 19%.In other words, more songs have been produced by fewer and fewer topline songwriters, who oversee the combinations of all the separately created sounds.First, we need a way to measure whether popular music in our parents’ generation (and every generation prior) was more musically diverse than today.

In the late-80s, the top ten producers were credited with half as many hits, about 19%.In other words, more songs have been produced by fewer and fewer topline songwriters, who oversee the combinations of all the separately created sounds.First, we need a way to measure whether popular music in our parents’ generation (and every generation prior) was more musically diverse than today.

Shortly after completing his dissertation, Jehan co-founded a company called Echo Nest, and the data became a pillar of Spotify’s recommendation systems, determining music similarity and accurately suggesting songs that sound alike.

This data is publicly available (the Music Genome Project version is confidential), and to measure whether songs sound similar, we’ll calculate the differences in Echo Nest’s 8 data points for top songs in the Billboard Hot 100, a peer-reviewed method employed by other music researchers.

In theory, the songs with most similar Echo Nest values should sound similar as well.

To make a claim about an era’s musical homogeneity, we just need to calculate the average distance in Echo Nest data points for all popular songs: How far away is a song from every other in that period?

While there are plenty of burgeoning Max Martins (e.g., Metro Boomin, DJ Khaled), it’s also the era of “Sound Cloud rappers”—labels sign talent after artists have made it big.

A young songwriter can find a “Meek Mill-Ace Hood Type Beat” on You Tube, pay a 0 license, and make “Panda” The obvious trend is that the Billboard Hot 100 will continue to musically converge, a path that might just be the natural progression of popular culture.

In hip hop, track-and-hook is almost an inevitable part of making beats out of other assembled sounds.

In pop, it didn’t take off until the mid-1990s, when a Swedish producer named Denniz Po P discovered Ace of Base’s demo and turned it into “All That She Wants” Denniz’s lineage most notably includes Max Martin and Luke Gottwald, known as Dr. Martin arguably did more than any living songwriter to refine the adrenaline-charged bubblegum sound of the past 10 years.

In short, originality has given way to homogeneity, with artists copying whatever’s in fashion (especially as rap music becomes today’s pop music).

Regardless of whether Snoop is right, the same could be said of 1990s hip hop. Or 1960s rock, when the Beatles (and their sound) permeated radio.

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