Science As A Vocation Essays

Science As A Vocation Essays-35
Tolstoj has given the simplest answer, with the words: “Science is meaningless because it gives no answer to the only question important for us: what shall we do and how shall we live? If, for instance, in the lecture-room of my former colleague Dietrich Schaefer in Berlin, pacifist students were to surround his desk and make an uproar, I should deplore it just as much as I should deplore the uproar which anti-pacifist students are said to have made against Professor Foerster, whose views in many ways are as remote as could be from mine. It does not belong there on the part of the students.

Tolstoj has given the simplest answer, with the words: “Science is meaningless because it gives no answer to the only question important for us: what shall we do and how shall we live? If, for instance, in the lecture-room of my former colleague Dietrich Schaefer in Berlin, pacifist students were to surround his desk and make an uproar, I should deplore it just as much as I should deplore the uproar which anti-pacifist students are said to have made against Professor Foerster, whose views in many ways are as remote as could be from mine. It does not belong there on the part of the students.

From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufstze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525.

As translated by Rodney Livingstone in David Owen (ed.), The Vocation Lectures: Science as a Vocation: Politics as a Vocation (2004), 11.

To the prophet and the demagogue, it is said: “Go your ways out into the streets and speak openly to the world”, that is, speak where criticism is possible.

In the lecture-room we stand opposite our audience, and it has to remain silent.

(1987) -- Carl Sagan Quotations by: Albert Einstein Isaac Newton Lord Kelvin Charles Darwin Srinivasa Ramanujan Carl Sagan Florence Nightingale Thomas Edison Aristotle Marie Curie Benjamin Franklin Winston Churchill Galileo Galilei Sigmund Freud Robert Bunsen Louis Pasteur Theodore Roosevelt Abraham Lincoln Ronald Reagan Leonardo Da Vinci Michio Kaku Karl Popper Johann Goethe Robert Oppenheimer Charles Kettering ...

(more people) Quotations about: Atomic Bomb Biology Chemistry Deforestation Engineering Anatomy Astronomy Bacteria Biochemistry Botany Conservation Dinosaur Environment Fractal Genetics Geology History of Science Invention Jupiter Knowledge Love Mathematics Measurement Medicine Natural Resource Organic Chemistry Physics Physician Quantum Theory Research Science and Art Teacher Technology Universe Volcano Virus Wind Power Women Scientists X-Rays Youth Zoology ...From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufstze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. A really definitive and good accomplishment is today always a specialized accomplishment. Whoaside from certain big children who are indeed found in the natural sciencesstill believes that the findings of astronomy, biology, physics, or chemistry could teach us anything about the meaning of the world? [In] the realm of science, what we have achieved will be obsolete in ten, twenty or fifty years.From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufstze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufstze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. That is the fate, indeed, that is the very meaning of scientific work.Scientific works certainly can last as gratifications because of their artistic quality, or they may remain important as a means of training. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 138.Yet they will be surpassed scientificallylet that be repeatedfor it is our common fate and, more our common goal. A different translation of a shorter excerpt from this quote, beginning [In] the realm of science, is also on the Max Weber Quotes web page on this site.If you have access to a journal via a society or association membership, please browse to your society journal, select an article to view, and follow the instructions in this box.Contact us if you experience any difficulty logging in.From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufstze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. It is a childish notion to think that a mathematician attains any scientifically valuable results by sitting at his desk with a ruler, calculating machines or other mechanical means. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 136.The mathematical imagination of a Weierstrass is naturally quite differently oriented in meaning and result than is the imagination of an artist, and differs basically in quality. Both are frenzy (in the sense of Platos mania) and inspiration. Only by strict specialization can the scientific worker become fully conscious, for once and perhaps never again in his lifetime, that he has achieved something that will endure. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 135. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 142.Neither does politics, however, belong in the lecture-room on the part of the docents, and when the docent is scientifically concerned with politics, it belongs there least of all...The true teacher will beware of imposing from the platform any political position upon the student, whether it is expressed or suggested.

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